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Old 06-12-06, 04:26 PM  
Libby
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
How do instructors avoid injuries?

I have worked out for years and have had to deal with aches, pains, injuries and now arthritis in my knee. How do instructors continue to make videos and workout without having major physical setbacks? My doctor said that the lunges and squats like Cathe does especially with the weights on the shoulders are very bad for your knees. How does Cathe do them without injuries? He also said the straight out in front extended leg lifts should be done lying flat on your back to avoid back injuries. But I never see instructors doing them that way. I love working out but it seems like I'm beginning to pay a price for some of the exercises that I've done for years and the repetitions that I've done. It almost feels like you can't win.

Libby
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Old 06-12-06, 05:59 PM  
sbh
 
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moderation

I taught aerobics for eight years. I was an animal! I just loved high intensity and with that also came high impact. I don't teach anymore because I blew out a few discs in my back. But I learned a valuable lesson. Everything in moderation. Change your routines often. Buy good quality workout shoes every six months. Change the type of exercise often. Example - alternate between step and walking, or kickboxing and water aerobics. The same type of exercise done repeatedly is good cardiovascular-wise, but not on the joints and ligaments and muscles. Stretching after every workout is also highly recommended.

Instructors do hurt themselves occassionally, then it's just time to rest and recover.
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Old 06-12-06, 08:37 PM  
fschulman
 
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Several instructors have had injuries in the past couple of years, including Cathe Friedrich, Christi Taylor and Charlene Prickett.
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Old 06-12-06, 11:47 PM  
Libby
 
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Instructors with injuries

Fschulman,

What type of injuries did they have and how long were they down? Do any of them ever get arthritis like I've just been diagnosed as having and have to give up the high impact aerobics?

Libby
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Old 06-13-06, 11:04 AM  
Kathryn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Libby
He also said the straight out in front extended leg lifts should be done lying flat on your back to avoid back injuries. But I never see instructors doing them that way.
What workouts are these in? I have many, many (many!) workouts, and I can't think of any off-hand that have this move in.

As for instructors with injuries, of course they get injured. Maybe less than the general public, because they are genetically tougher (just as models are genetically thinner and taller for the most part---they choose their profession, in part, based on what they do best). I remember Barbara McDermott (a CIA instructor who made some fun step workouts in the 90's.) wearing a knee brace in the last video I saw her in. Coincidence that she never made any more videos?
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Old 06-13-06, 11:48 AM  
Libby
 
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Extended leg exercises

Denise Austin does them, Karen Voight's Great Weighted workout, Beachbody Shape it Up and others. They sit up or lean back on their elbows and lift their legs but my doctor said to lie flat on my back with one knee bent and lift the other straight out in front of me.

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Old 06-13-06, 11:51 AM  
Kathryn
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I gotcha!
I though you might be refering to some standing version of it. It's pretty easy to modify the seated version to a lying version. I've been to PT for patellofemoral pain syndrome, and the leg lifts were one exercise they gave me...the seated, not the lying, version.
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Old 06-13-06, 12:42 PM  
Pratima
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Something I've thought about a lot over the years is that instructors also have access to better equipment, which may make a bit of difference. I'm referring mostly to floors that help absorb impact, or a variety of equipment that helps them avoid modifying in potentially dangerous ways. Home exercisers have limited resources, and maybe this sets up for injury.

I have nothing to back this up, it's just something I've pondered on occasion.
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Old 06-13-06, 08:59 PM  
fschulman
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Libby
Fschulman,

What type of injuries did they have and how long were they down? Do any of them ever get arthritis like I've just been diagnosed as having and have to give up the high impact aerobics?

Libby
Cathe has a description of her injury and the surgery she required on her website. I don't know the details of the injuries of the other two, only that they both have delayed making new DVDs.

Since arthritis is not usually diagnosed until people are over 40, I don't know how many instructors may have it now. I expect it will become a common problem as more of the instructors hit their mid to late 40's.

I have arthritis in my hip and have lost some of my flexibility. I find the FitPrime tapes, which were designed by women who I believe are now in their 50's, adjusts exercises and stretches for those with less flexibility.

I no longer do high impact, but have learned to modify advanced step and hi/lo tapes so I still get a good cardio workout. I find variety is important. Basic cardio tapes with a lot of repetition seem more likely to aggravate my leg than those with complex choreography. Modifying the routines is usually easy -- just do the first version that the instructor shows.

I don't miss high impact because I still get good workouts. My biggest regret is I did not know anything about arthritis and missed the early signs (stiffness in my quad that I thought was from exercise). I would have stopped doing high impact immediately. Instead, I ended up injuring my leg and my physical therapist noticed my tight hip.
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Old 06-13-06, 09:05 PM  
MichelleRN
 
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Instructors DO experience injury! As a 40 something hard impact high step girl......a while back that is, I can tell ya that wear and tear comes in by 40, and where as you can't see the "knots' of arthritis, you CAN see degeneration on MRI, or at least the symptoms begin....from overuse....high impact is great in small doses while you're under 35, and after that, there are RAPID and major changes the body experiences...lest we say aging, that make injury more probable. Cathe, Charlene....bionic women....we thought...and now we know, they are women like all of us....still fabulous though huh?
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